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010    2014000774 
020    9780306823329 :|c$25.99 
020    0306823322 :|c$25.99 
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069    01745578 
082 00 796.357/64097309045|223 
099    796.3576|aM 
100 1  Madden, Bill. 
245 10 1954 :|bthe year Willie Mays and the first generation of 
       black superstars changed major league baseball forever /
       |cby Bill Madden. 
250    First Da Capo Press edition. 
264  1 Boston, MA :|bDa Capo Press,  a member of Perseus Books 
       Group,|c2014. 
300    xiii, 290 pages :|billustrations ;|c24 cm 
336    text|btxt|2rdacontent 
337    unmediated|bn|2rdamedia 
338    volume|bnc|2rdacarrier 
504    Includes bibliographical references (pages 267-268) and 
       index. 
520    "Jackie Robinson heroically broke the color barrier in 
       1947. But how--and, in practice, when--did the integration
       of the sport actually occur? Bill Madden shows that 
       baseball's famous "black experiment" did not truly succeed
       until the coming of age of Willie Mays and the emergence 
       of some star players--Larry Doby, Hank Aaron, and Ernie 
       Banks--in 1954. And as a relevant backdrop off the field, 
       it was in May of that year that the US Supreme Court 
       unanimously ruled, in the case of Brown v. Board of 
       Education, that segregation be outlawed in America's 
       public schools.  Featuring original interviews with key 
       players and weaving together the narrative of one of 
       baseball's greatest seasons with the racially charged 
       events of that year, 1954 demonstrates how our national 
       pastime--with the notable exception of the Yankees, who 
       represented white supremacy in the game--was actually 
       ahead of the curve in terms of the acceptance of black 
       Americans, while the nation at large continued to struggle
       with tolerance"--|cProvided by publisher. 
520    "Jackie Robinson heroically broke the color barrier in 
       1947. But how--and, in practice, when--did the integration
       of the sport actually occur? Bill Madden shows that 
       baseball's famous "black experiment" did not truly succeed
       until the coming of age of Willie Mays and the emergence 
       of some star players--Larry Doby, Hank Aaron, and Ernie 
       Banks--in 1954. And as a relevant backdrop off the field, 
       it was in May of that year that the US Supreme Court 
       unanimously ruled, in the case of Brown v. Board of 
       Education, that segregation be outlawed in America's 
       public schools. Featuring original interviews with key 
       players and weaving together the narrative of one of 
       baseball's greatest seasons with the racially charged 
       events of that year, 1954 demonstrates how our national 
       pastime--with the notable exception of the Yankees, who 
       represented white supremacy in the game--was actually 
       ahead of the curve in terms of the acceptance of black 
       Americans, while the nation at large continued to struggle
       with tolerance"--|cProvided by publisher. 
600 10 Mays, Willie,|d1931- 
650  0 Baseball|zUnited States|xHistory|y20th century. 
650  0 African American baseball players|xHistory|y20th century. 
650  0 Discrimination in sports|zUnited States|xHistory|y20th 
       century. 
947    B&T LEASED NON-FIC 
948    MARS 
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